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THE SOLUTION - WORKING DRAWING

FIRST ANGLE PROJECTION

V. Ryan © 2001-2008

 

A working drawing is the final ‘constructed’ drawing, produced as part of the design process. It usually consists of a front, side and plan view of the solution. Sometimes there are two views but this depends on the complexity of the solution. Dimensions are added so that any person using the working drawing can manufacture the design. Usually there are at least six dimensions but you can add as many as you feel are required in order for the manufacturer to make your solution.
The working drawing should be precise and drawn to a scale. If the drawing is half the size of the solution then the scale is 1:2. If the drawing is a 3rd the size of the solution then the scale is 1:3.
Use a 2H pencil or a fine black pen for the final outline. This will allow the drawing to stand out. The dimensions are usually quite faint apart from the arrow heads and the measurement.

 

(WORKING DRAWING SEEN ABOVE IS DRAWN IN FIRST ANGLE PROJECTION)

For more information regarding drawing using orthographic projection - click here.

 

 

 
 

PARTS LIST

 
     

A ‘Parts List’ is a very important feature of the working drawing as all the parts are listed, with measurements. The materials used are also mentioned as well as the finish applied to the individual pieces.
Can you complete the parts list on the right? The working drawing clearly shows a clock with an electronic mechanism. Also included are hands and numbers.

     
PART No No OFF DESCRIPTION MATERIALS DIMENSIONS FINISH
1 1 CLOCK FACE MDF   RED PAINT
2 1 CLOCK BACK PERSPEX Dia. 156mm x 20mm NONE
3 1 MECHANISM     NONE
4 1 GLASS     POLISH
5 1 HANDS     BLACK
6 2 NUMBERS     RED
     

Try to complete the parts list above - you may need to estimate some measurements

     
 
     

FURTHER INFORMATION

     
The example shown below has a back view, side view and plan view of a pine box with a perspex lid. The box contains an educational toy.. The front view is not needed because it is plain, with no detail. The back view has hinges and consequently it is important that it is drawn. The working drawing (seen below) is accurate and detailed so that a suitably skilled person could manufacture the design from the information shown.
1. The working drawing should be precise and drawn to a scale. The drawing opposite is half the size of the solution, the scale is 1:2. If the drawing was a 3rd the size of the original then the scale would be 1:3.
2. Usually there are at least six dimensions but you can add as many as you feel are required in order that the precise size of your design can be determined by anyone reading the drawing.
3. Use a 2H pencil or a fine black pen for the final outline, as the drawing will then stand out.
4. Draw the measurements (dimensions) very carefully. Some example dimensions are shown below. They should be drawn with a sharp 2H pencil.

The arrows and the written measurement should be dark and the rest of each dimension should be faint. Dimensions are normally drawn as shown in (a) although dimensions under 9mm should be drawn as shown in (b). Diameters and radii are drawn as shown in (c).
5. A parts list should be included. This gives details such as overall dimensions, materials and finishes of each part.
6. Usually a working drawing is drawn in 3rd angle projection, add the symbol to the drawing.

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

A. Consider carefully the type of views you need to draw (front, side, plan etc...) and draw a rough version.
B. Number the parts in order, so that the numbers are in sequence.
C. Use a T-square and set squares to help you draw the proper version of the working drawing.
D. Add six dimensions, or more if necessary.
E. Do not fall behind in your work as you may find it difficult to catch up.

 

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