CLICK HERE FOR INDEX PAGE

CENTRAL AMERICAN CEDAR

V. Ryan 2008

 

Similar to the softer species of Mahogany and often used as an inexpensive Mahogany substitute. Sometimes known as Aromatic or Cigar Box Cedar and has a very a pleasant cedar fragrance. A superior timber to Brazilian Cedar. FSC Certified.

Cedrela odorata
Family: Meliaceae

Distribution: Cedrela odorata is distributed throughout Central America including, Guatemala, Honduras, and Belize. It also grows in Trinidad, Dominica and other Caribbean islands.

 
 

General Characteristics: The timber from this species can be variable and wood from young (fast grown) trees is lighter in colour and softer, although tougher than that from older trees. The more slowly grown, dense and scented timber is more commercial. The heartwood is pinkish to reddish-brown when freshly cut but becomes red or dark reddish- brown after exposure. The sapwood is greyish-white or pinkish and normally well defined from the heartwood. Supplies of the timber can exude oil which appears as a sticky gum on surfaces and this can be a problem when finishing. The grain is straight with the texture being medium, with darker-coloured material often having a more coarser texture. One of the main characteristics of this timber is its quite pronounced 'cedar-like' scent. In general it can sometimes resemble lighter types of Central American Mahogany which are from the same family.

Durability: The heartwood is rated as durable, although there is some variability in this. It is resistant to termites, but has low resistance to marine borers.

Strength: The strength of Central American Cedar is roughly comparable to Honduras Mahogany, Swietenia macrophylla, in all strength properties except hardness, resistance to shear and compression and tension across the grain, in which it is a little inferior.

 
 
 
CLICK HERE FOR NATURAL WOODS IN DETAIL
 
CLICK HERE FOR RESISTANT MATERIALS INDEX PAGE
 
 
 

 
Google
 
Web www.technologystudent.com